if you’re a female poet: 1. read this. 2. break the pattern

 “I’ve noticed a difference in the way male and female writers behave. Upon rejection, of a pitch or a story—the content is neither here nor there—male writers will reply with another pitch or story, sometimes a day or two later, but often immediately. Female writers typically respond with a kind, thank-you email, but wait weeks or even months to submit again. This is a generalization, and certainly not true of every male or female writer, but my inbox bears witness to this pattern. Does this happen to me because I am a female editor? I don’t know. I do know that my male colleagues have experienced similar submission behavior. Does this make a difference in the way male and female writers are treated? Maybe, in the sense that the more you submit the more likely you are to be published (if you believe it’s a numbers game); the more your name is in the ether at editorial meetings, the more likely you are to receive an assignment. In the end, timidity is not your friend. We’ve had multiple pitches or multiple stories under consideration from the same writer, usually male.”-Allison Wright

More:

EDITORIAL POWER MEANS BLOWING UP THE MACHINE FROM THE INSIDE:NINE WOMEN EDITORS ON SEXUAL DISCRIMINATION IN THE LITERARY WORLD, PART ONELiterary Hub – February 7, 2018

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